Union Square Farmers Market: Hell yeah!

Man, it’s hot out there! Too hot. I knew it was going to be a very tough task to take the subway from Harlem down and across to Union Square for the farmers market, but I took my man-pill and did it. And, boy, did it pay off.

The farmers market was so boss today. There was an abundance of everything, and I didn’t even get there early for the morning rush. It should have been leftovers-town by the time I made it there, but there was still SO much to choose from. It blew my mind.

Why go to the farmers market? Isn’t it a bunch of farming hippies who will try to make you read Kerouac and sing Hare Krishna? (Actually, there are hippies that dance around and sing Hare Krishna, but they’re off to the side.) I digress!

Ten Reasons to Shop at your local Farmers Market: 

  1. The food tastes like food is supposed to taste. Ever wonder what a tomato is really supposed to taste like? You ain’t really had one if you’re only getting them from PathMart.
  2. Seasonal food selection is how we’re supposed to eat. It’s how nature naturally puts it out in your local region. Looking forward to asparagus in the spring and sweet corn in the summer keeps things special.
  3. Supporting your local community is the ethical thing to do. You’re going to spend money on food. Might as well give it to the good guys.
  4. It’s environmentally beneficial. Buying produce that have been hauled 1,500 miles in a truck gives you a rather large carbon footprint. Extra packaging is wasteful.
  5. Stop poisoning your body. Food in most grocery stores are packed with hormones, antibiotics, and genetic modification. That stuff has been scientifically proven to give us cancer, and they don’t even have to tell you about it on the label. Yikes!
  6. Get down with some variety! These guys grow crazy stuff that you’ve probably never even seen before. Red carrots, insane heirloom tomatoes, stinging nettles, watermelon radishes… spice up yo kitchen!
  7. It’s nicer to animals. Farmers markets will have places that humanely treat the chickens, goats, ostriches, and cows that produce their product. Don’t be that person who just buys “normal” eggs and doesn’t take personal responsibility for funding an industry that tortures millions of chickens. Literally, tortures them. You just can’t be apathetic about this stuff.
  8. You get to know where your food came from. It’s rather nice looking the guy who grew your zucchinis in the eye.
  9. Learn from people who know a lot about food. Ask questions and get tips on recipes. No better place to do it, in my opinion.
  10. Yay, community! Be a part of something. It’s much better to stroll outdoors and talk to people rather than push a metal cart under artificial lights.

Now, look. If I could get everything from the farmers market, I would. Sometimes, I need avocados when they aren’t in season in my region. So I always go to the farmers market first, get what I can, then I’ll stop by a supermarket that has healthy and organic options. (I like Fairway and Whole Foods.) If we all do what we can, it’s something, right?

Bottom line: Find your local farmers market and get out there. Get to meet the people who are passionate about growing stuff that will actually nourish you rather than support corporations that pump chemicals into plants to make them last longer on a shelf.

Some pictures from this afternoon:

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Different herbs you can buy to plant in your garden or pot in the kitchen. Cooking with real herbs that I’ve personally potted and tended to to has changed my life for the better.

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More herbs.

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Holy beet!

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Look at all those different colored carrots. Imagine using all three varieties for dinner tonight… pretty AND delicious.

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Beets are amazing. They are so tasty and uber good for you. Chef B’Friend usually boils a big one that we slice off and eat during the week, and I use raw beets for juicing.

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Heirloom tomatoes.

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Pink spring onions. Yeah, I bought them because they were pink. Stop judging me.

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Kale and fresh garlic. Cooking with fresh garlic is something that I’ve recently been introduced to by Chef B’friend. It’s the way to go.

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Two baskets of squash and cucumbers. Just hangin’ out.

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Different varieties of Basil. Regular, bushy, and purple. I grow all three in my little apartment garden.

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Greens!

The stand that I’m in love with the most is the specialty salad stand. The farm is Windfall Farms, and it is one of the more expensive places represented. I get sprouts and a few different types of expensive greens that I’ll use all week long to mix into cheaper lettuce I buy from another stand. It’s so worth it. Eating REAL fresh lettuce and greens has been one of the more enjoyable things I’ve experienced with changing my lifestyle. I don’t even want to order salads from restaurants now because I know what salad greens should REALLY taste like.

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Windfall Farms

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A cooler of squash blossoms. Boom goes the dynamite!

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This is the 6 dollar a pound mix.

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Mesclun. Not to be confused with Mescaline.

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Part of why they are so expensive is that it’s all been pre-washed for you. You can just pop it into a bag (USE THE TONGS) and throw it directly on a plate when you get home.

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This is one of the more expensive greens ($12 a pound) that includes edible flowers! How cool is that!?

Other Pictures:

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Squash

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Tomatoes

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Radishes, greens, and herbs

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One of my favorite places to get plants for my little NY garden

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They have a lot to choose from.

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Badass peppers

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Did I mention you can try and buy alcohol here! Party!

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This camomile plant has sprung a flower. Put THAT in yo tea.

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More herb varieties

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Squash with blossoms poppin’ out the top.

Ah, the spoils of war!

Ah, the spoils of war!

Do you know where YOUR food comes from? Leave a comment! 

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One thought on “Union Square Farmers Market: Hell yeah!

  1. […] from your local Farmers Market, or grow your own tomatoes. I do it, and it’s not […]

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